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Goumois

Goumois is a little special. Why, you may ask? Well, Goumois is two villages.  One is French and the other is Swiss.  The villages are divided by the Doubs River with a bridge joining them.   Before the Treaty of Vienna Goumois was one village but afterwards it was separated into two.

The two villages are different even if the name is the same due to the cultural differences of the French and Swiss.  It isn’t only a river that separates the two villages but an accent, culture and nationality.   Yet, I have a feeling that residents from both sides pass over the bridge to the other Goumois without much thought.   Both villages are still connected through a long history even if there are differences between them.

Goumois
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The Doubs River which separates France and Switzerland at Goumois.

Goumois, Switzerland
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Old gas pumps in Goumois, Switzerland.

Le Rocher du singe near Goumois, Switzerland
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Le Rocher du singe (the monkey rock).

Vilay with my son and four year old daughter.  My five year old stayed behind with me talking about the rabbits she had petted earier and wanted to pet again.

Goumois, France
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A house with bright blue shutters on the French side of the Doubs.  Picture taken on the Swiss side.

The rabbits my five year old went on and on about.  Seriously, I think the rabbits were her favorite part of visiting Goumois.  Shown above is the second petting session.

Goumois, Switzerland
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To the left of this photo is a Swiss postal truck while in the back is the Swiss customs car (it is the black one).  The customs office is right in front of the customs car.  On the French side there is no customs office or customs officers.

Swiss customs was checking all cars coming over from France for about a half hour.  They weren’t interested in checking people walking over the bridge but only the people in cars.

I did over hear a Swiss man ask in a surprised voice if they really needed his passport.  The customs man answered yes.  I can see where it would be an issue crossing over the border without your passport.  However, the residents in Goumois (both sides) must cross over all the time forgetting all about the border.

Goumois
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The view we had while drinking a coffee.  It was one of the best coffees I have had in a while.  The Swiss restaurants were open in the morning hours while the French restaurants were not.

Goumois, Switzerland
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The beginning of the bridge on the Swiss side.

My four French walking over to French soil.

Goumois, France
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From French Goumois you can see the Swiss mountain side.

Goumois, France
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In the middle of this photo the bridge is visible from the French side to the Swiss side.

Doubs-frontiére:  Goumois, un village franco-Suisse (if you can read French and like history you will enjoy this.  Even if you can’t read French there are still old photos of Goumois during the occupation of the Germans that are interesting to look at – make sure to scroll down.)

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  • Pardon My French September 1, 2008, 10:58 pm

    Lol at the bunnies! We also love walks, although ours are still fairly short and mundane and the babe is in a backpack. I can’t wait to get out into the countryside and do some ones that are similar to these.

  • expatraveler September 2, 2008, 1:44 am

    Oh wow – the history behind this place. There is a place near Montreux with this same thing, half the city is Swiss and the other half French. This city is St-Gingolph. I am not sure if you can see the link but find it in Wikipedia.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St-Gingolph

    By the way, the photos are so beautiful! I have moved finally and am in my new home already. It will be fun learning and seeing much more European flavor… :)

  • Frédé September 2, 2008, 9:19 pm

    Hi Pumpkin, I’m glad I’ve found your blog (I don’t remember how, however), it’s full of surprises. Your interest in discovering your new home country is great. Although it’s mine, I guess you’ll know more about it in a while :o). Have a nice week ! Frédérique

  • Pumpkin September 4, 2008, 10:51 am

    Pardon My French,
    We have always walked with the kids even when they were young. We would put them in a stroller and go. Of course, that was easier in the city or here in the Jura where we can walk on normal roads or paved tractor roads. I have to admit that we can’t wait until our son is out of the stroller completely. We are so tired of pushing strollers!!! :)

    Frédérique,
    We love living here in Switzerland. It is so beautiful here and we adore walking in the mountains.

    I still haven’t been to the Jungfrau. Vilay and I dream about going there but it is hard to do in a one day train trip.

    There is so much to see and do in Switzerland all year round. Switzerland is wonderful for families! :)

  • Pumpkin September 4, 2008, 10:55 am

    Expatraveler,

    Thank you for the link. I am going to add it to our list of cities to visit. I am so happy for you and can’t wait to here more about your new life there. :)

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